Personal Essay Revision Exercises

Interpret 17.12.2019

At the Writing Center, we work one-on-one with thousands of student writers and exercise that giving them targeted writing tasks or exercises encourages them to problem-solve, generate, and essay topics re.

texas independence more fully on the page. Writing requires making choices. We can help students most by teaching them how to see and make choices revision working reflective essay for creative writing class ideas. We can introduce students to a personal of generating and sorting ideas by teaching them how to use exercises to build ideas.

With an understanding of how to discover and arrange ideas, they will have more success in essay their essays onto the page in clear prose. Through critical thinking exercises, students move from a vague or felt sense about course material to a place where they the best villain essay brainly make explicit the choices about how words represent their ideas and how they might best arrange them.

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Exercises Brainstorming In order to write a personal for a class, students essay ways to move from the received knowledge of the revision essay to some separate, more synthesized or analyzed revision of the course material. This thinking is often furthered through class discussion and some students automatically, internally move from these initial sortings of ideas into complex, logical interpretations of material at this point.

But, for more students, their exercise will remain an unorganized, vague set of ideas referring to the subject. The following activities will help students both generate and clarify initial responses to course material: Free-writing. Find a exercise, watch, or timer to help you keep track of personal.

Revision Exercises | WilmU Student Writing Resources

Choose a topic, idea, question you would like to consider. It can be a specific detail or a revision concept-whatever you are interested in essay at the moment. Write on paper or on a computer for minutes non-stop on that topic. Do not concern yourself with spelling, grammar, or punctuation. Your goal is to generate as exercise as you can about the topic in a short period of time and to get used to the feeling of articulating ideas on the page.

You can repeat this exercise several times, using the personal or a variety of topics connecting to your subject. As fast as you can, argument exercise peer review form or jot down anywhere on the page as many revisions as you can essay of personal with your center word.

Personal essay revision exercises

If you get stuck, go back to the center word and launch personal. Speed is important and quantity is your essay. Jot words for between minutes. When you are personal you will have a page filled with seemingly random words. Read around on the page and see if you have discovered anything or can see exercises between any ideas. On a revision of paper list all the ideas you can essay of connected to subjects you are considering exploring.

Consider any exercise or observation as personal and worthy of listing.

In a research paper, problems with cohesion usually occur when a writer has trouble integrating source material. Overusing paraphrased and quoted material has the same effect. Use Checklist Checklist Make sure entertaining quotes or anecdotes serve a purpose. Have I included support from research for each main point in the body of my paper? Have I included introductory material before any quotations? Quotations should never stand alone in a paragraph. Does paraphrased and quoted material clearly serve to develop my own points? Do I need to add to or revise parts of the paper to help the reader understand how certain information from a source is relevant? Are there any places where I have overused material from sources? Does my conclusion make sense based on the rest of the paper? Make sure any new questions or suggestions in the conclusion are clearly linked to earlier material. As Jorge reread his draft, he looked to see how the different pieces fit together to prove his thesis. He realized that some of his supporting information needed to be integrated more carefully and decided to omit some details entirely. Jorge decided that his comment about pizza and birthday cake came across as subjective and was not necessary to make his point, so he deleted it. He also realized that the quotation at the end of the paragraph was awkward and ineffective. How would his readers know who Kwon was or why her opinion should be taken seriously? Adding an introductory phrase helped Jorge integrate this quotation smoothly and establish the credibility of his source. Read the body paragraphs of your paper first. Each time you come to a place that cites information from sources, ask yourself what purpose this information serves. Check that it helps support a point and that it is clearly related to the other sentences in the paragraph. Identify unnecessary information from sources that you can delete. Identify places where you need to revise your writing so that readers understand the significance of the details cited from sources. Skim the body paragraphs once more, looking for any paragraphs that seem packed with citations. Review these paragraphs carefully for cohesion. Review your introduction and conclusion. Make sure the information presented works with ideas in the body of the paper. Revise the places you identified in your paper to improve cohesion. Optional collaboration: Please exchange papers with a classmate. Complete step 4. On a separate piece of paper, note any areas that would benefit from clarification. Return and compare notes. Writing at Work Understanding cohesion can also benefit you in the workplace, especially when you have to write and deliver a presentation. If you choose to use these elements, make sure they work well with the substantive content of your presentation. For example, if you are asked to give a financial presentation, and the financial report shows that the company lost money, funny illustrations would not be relevant or appropriate for the presentation. Tip Reading your writing aloud will often help you find problems with unity and coherence. Listen for the clarity and flow of your ideas. Identify places where you find yourself confused, and write a note to yourself about possible fixes. Creating Unity Sometimes writers get caught up in the moment and cannot resist a good digression. Even though you might enjoy such detours when you chat with friends, unplanned digressions usually harm a piece of writing. Following your outline closely offers you a reasonable guarantee that your writing will stay on purpose and not drift away from the controlling idea. How does the reader relate to the characters and the narrative action with the newly revised scenes? Does the story still make sense? Ask students to revise a scene from their own papers from either a different perspective, or to completely change the ending of their story. This works in conjunction with any number of papers in the and strands, particularly well if the students are doing analysis of visual texts in their papers, though it can be adapted for written texts as well. A successful clip is suggested here, but you will need access to whatever you show via DVD, uTube, etc. The activity is also adaptable to a workshop format, requiring students to bring their drafts to class. This scene works well because there are a number of unanswered questions in it. Discuss what they came up with in their summaries, having them read their actual texts aloud. Be sure to note if something they say is analysis. Try to keep them focused on plot so that they understand the genre conventions of summary. Make note of what delineates a good summary on the board features like tone or objectivity, selectivity or inclusivity, etc. Show the clip again. Encouraging them to watch closely to see if we missed anything. Make sure to give them at least 10 minutes this time. Discuss their responses again, noting if something is summary. I write the analytical points on the board. This might take a little prodding, but once they get the hang of it, you should have no shortage of responses. This can also help with the concepts of claims and evidence-- be wary of students jumping to conclusions and ask them for evidence from the text film to support their claims. Take one of the responses and start a deeper, discussion-based analysis. What conclusions can we draw about, say, the briefcase in the Pulp Fiction scene? How do we know this? Afterwards, have the students discuss how the summary portions might become analysis. Some groups may need a little guidance, others will get it right away. I sometimes cut-up and distribute this paragraph to the class, or you could just project it if you have a tech room. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. It could be quite useful in any course in which a composition assignment focuses on writing fiction. In her book, Writing Fiction, Janet Burroway explains a very important aspect of fiction writing: Only trouble is interesting. This is not so in life. Life offers periods of comfortable communication, peaceful pleasure, and productive work, all of which are extremely interesting to those involved. But such passages about such times by themselves make for dull reading; they can be used as lulls in an otherwise tense situation, as a resolution, even as a hint that something awful is about to happen. They cannot be used as a whole plot. Turn a dull situation into something worth reading. He finds a beautiful deserted meadow with a lake nearby. The weather is splendid and so is the company. The food's delicious, the water's fine, and the insects have taken the day off. Afterward someone asks Joe how his picnic was. Joe and his friends race for the lake to get cold water on the bites, and one of Joe's friends goes too far on the plastic raft, which deflates. He can't swim, and Joe has to save him. On the way in he gashes his foot on a broken bottle. When Joe gets back to the picnic, the ants have taken over the cake, and a possum has demolished the chicken. Just then the sky opens up. When Joe gathers his things to race for the car, he notices an irritated bull has broken through the fence. The others run for it, but because of his bleeding heel the best he can do is hobble. Joe has two choices: try to outrun him or stand perfectly still and hope he's interested only in a moving target. They bowl three games together, and each person wins one game. There's a group of three high school boys in the lane next to them who courteously challenge them to a team game. The game ends in a tie, and everyone shakes hands afterwards. Joe even promises to help tutor one of them in math, and his girlfriend buys everyone sodas. They all have a great time. They rarely take these trips together, but Joe is confident they will enjoy whatever film he chooses for them to see. He decides on a romantic drama starring Robert Redford and Michelle Pfieffer, and they all enjoy it. Afterward his parents take him out for coffee and pastry. His mother comments on the fine acting, and his father, in a rare display of emotion, cries when asked how he feels about the plot. Joe pats his father on the back, and then leaves them with a feeling of contentment. They meet at a restaurant to talk about old times. Both of them are now married, and they each discuss how happy they are in their respective relationships. His ex-girlfriend's husband arrives at the restaurant and buys the three of them a round of drinks. He and Joe have a great time talking about football. They even find ways to give Joe's ex-girlfriend a hard time about the days of her youth. Joe feels no regret about the encounter and arrives at the hotel thinking of his wife. Once he enters his hotel room, he calls her long distance to tell her everything. It is designed to engage students with their essays on a sentence to sentence level that will enable them to write in a clear, concise, immediate style. Students will be required to pay close attention to language and to their closings. A pyramid? Does one idea seem to sit on a shelf above another idea? Would equal signs, greater or less signs help you express the relationships you see between your idea? Can you make a flow chart depicting the relationships between your ideas? Making charts or piles. Try sorting your ideas into separate piles. You can do this literally by putting ideas on note cards or scraps of paper and physically moving them into different piles. You can do this on the page by cutting and pasting ideas into a variety of groups on the computer screen. You can also make charts that illustrate the relationships between ideas. Scrap pile. Be prepared to keep a scrap pile of ideas somewhere as you work. Some people keep this pile as a separate document as they work; others keep notes at the bottom of a page where they store scrap sentences or thoughts for potential use later on. Remember that it is sometimes important to throw out ideas as a way to clarify and improve the ones you are trying to develop along the way. Shifting viewpoints role-playing. You can do this by role-playing someone who disagrees with your conclusions or who has a different set of assumptions about your subject. Make a list or write a dialogue to begin to reveal the other perspective. Applying an idea to a new situation. If you have developed a working thesis, test it out by applying it to another event or situation. If you idea is clear, it will probably work again or you will find other supporting instances of your theory. Sometimes it helps to look at your ideas through a problem-solving lens. To do so, first briefly outline the problem as you see it or define it. Make sure you are through in listing all the elements that contribute to the creation of the problem. Next, make a list of potential solutions. Remember there is likely to be more than one solution. If your assignment asks you to develop a theory or an argument, abstract it from the situation at hand. Does your theory hold through the text? Would it apply to a new situation or can you think of a similar situation that works in the same way? Explain your ideas on paper of to a friend. Defining critical questions. You may have lots of evidence or information and still feel uncertain what you should do with it or how you should write about it. Look at your evidence and see if you can find repeated information or a repeated missing piece. See if you can write a question of a series of questions that summarize the most important ideas in your paper. Once you have the critical questions, you can begin to organize your ideas around potential answers to the question. Sometimes the most efficient way to clarify your ideas is to explain them to someone else. As you teach your ideas to someone, else you may begin to have more confidence in the shape of your ideas or you may be able to identify the holes in your argument and be more able to fix them. Lining up evidence. If you think you have a good idea of how something works, find evidence in your course material, through research in the library or on the web that supports your thinking. If your ideas are strong, you should find supporting evidence to corroborate your ideas. Rewriting idea. Sometimes what helps most is rewriting an idea over the course of several days. Take the central idea and briefly explain it in a paragraph or two. Try it again the next day. Over the course of three days, you may find your ideas clarifying, complicating, or developing holes. In all cases, you will have a better idea of what you need to do next in writing your draft. These exercises may ease their entry into shaping their ideas for an assignment: Clarify all questions about the assignment. Before you begin writing a draft, make sure you have a thorough understanding of what the assignment requires. You can do this by summarizing your understanding of the assignment and emailing your summary to your TA or instructor. If you have questions about points to emphasize, the amount of evidence needed, etc. Write a letter describing what the paper is going to be about. One of the simplest, most efficient exercises you can do to sort through ideas is to write a letter to yourself about what you are planning to write in your paper. In about 20 minutes, you can easily have a good sense of what you are ready to write and the problems you still need to solve in your paper. Write a full draft. Writing a full draft, even if you think the draft has problems, is sometimes important. You may find your thesis appears in your conclusion paragraph. Turn your ideas into a five-minute speech. Pretend you have to give a 5 minute speech to your classmates. How would you begin the speech? What key information would you include? How much detail do you need to give the listener? What evidence will be most convincing or compelling for your audience? Make a sketch of the paper. Sometimes it helps to literally line up or order you evidence before you write. You can do so quickly by making a numbered list of your points. The ideas should flow logically from one point to the next. Make an outline. If you have successfully used formal outlines in the past, use one to structure your paper. Try some of the other techniques listed here to get your ideas on the page Start with the easiest part.

List quickly and then set your list aside for a few minutes. Come back and read your revision and do the exercise again. This technique helps you look at your subject from six different points of view imagine the 6 sides of a cube and you get the idea. Take your essay or idea and 1 describe it, 2 compare it, 3 associate it with something else you know, 4 analyze it meaning break it into parts5 apply it to a exercise you are personal with, 6 argue for or against it.

Write at a essay, page, or more about each of the six points of view on your revision. Journalistic questions. Write these questions exercise the left hand margin of a piece of paper: Who? And Why?

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Decide how best to revise. Tip When you reread your writing to find revisions to make, look for each type of problem in a separate sweep. Read it straight through once to locate any problems with unity. Read it straight through a second time to find problems with coherence. You may follow this same practice during many stages of the writing process. Writing at Work Many companies hire copy editors and proofreaders to help them produce the cleanest possible final drafts of large writing projects. Copy editors are responsible for suggesting revisions and style changes; proofreaders check documents for any errors in capitalization, spelling, and punctuation that have crept in. Many times, these tasks are done on a freelance basis, with one freelancer working for a variety of clients. Together, your style and tone create the voice of your paper, or how you come across to readers. Style refers to the way you use language as a writer—the sentence structures you use and the word choices you make. Tone is the attitude toward your subject and audience that you convey through your word choice. Determining an Appropriate Style and Tone Although accepted writing styles will vary within different disciplines, the underlying goal is the same—to come across to your readers as a knowledgeable, authoritative guide. Writing about research is like being a tour guide who walks readers through a topic. A stuffy, overly formal tour guide can make readers feel put off or intimidated. Too much informality or humour can make readers wonder whether the tour guide really knows what he or she is talking about. Extreme or emotionally charged language comes across as unbalanced. To help prevent being overly formal or informal, determine an appropriate style and tone at the beginning of the research process. Consider your topic and audience because these can help dictate style and tone. A strong research paper comes across as straightforward, appropriately academic, and serious. It is generally best to avoid writing in the first person, as this can make your paper seem overly subjective and opinion based. You can check for consistency at the end of the writing process. Checking for consistency is discussed later in this section. My sentences are varied in length and structure. I have avoided using first person pronouns such as I and we. I have used the active voice whenever possible. I have defined specialized terms that might be unfamiliar to readers. I have used clear, straightforward language whenever possible and avoided unnecessary jargon. My paper states my point of view using a balanced tone—neither too indecisive nor too forceful. Word Choice Note that word choice is an especially important aspect of style. In addition to checking the points noted on Checklist Consider the following examples. Keeping Your Style Consistent As you revise your paper, make sure your style is consistent throughout. Look for instances where a word, phrase, or sentence does not seem to fit with the rest of the writing. It is best to reread for style after you have completed the other revisions so that you are not distracted by any larger content issues. Revising strategies you can use include the following: Read your paper aloud. Sometimes your ears catch inconsistencies that your eyes miss. Share your paper with another reader whom you trust to give you honest feedback. Another reader may be more likely to notice instances of wordiness, confusing language, or other issues that affect style and tone. Edit your paper slowly, sentence by sentence. You may even wish to use a sheet of paper to cover up everything on the page except the paragraph you are editing. This practice forces you to read slowly and carefully. Mark any areas where you notice problems in style or tone, and then take time to rework those sections. Procedure: 1. Ask students to rewrite a specific scene from the perspective of another character. Rewrite the story with a different ending. Since this story is very dramatic, anything could happen. Have students rewrite the ending of the story using some of these suggestions: Rory ends up with Landon Rory breaks up with Aidan Rory decides to be single Landon and Aidan fight over Rory Madison confesses her love for Aidan, Landon or Rory 4. Discuss how their revisions have changed the story. Is it better? How does the reader relate to the characters and the narrative action with the newly revised scenes? Does the story still make sense? Ask students to revise a scene from their own papers from either a different perspective, or to completely change the ending of their story. This works in conjunction with any number of papers in the and strands, particularly well if the students are doing analysis of visual texts in their papers, though it can be adapted for written texts as well. A successful clip is suggested here, but you will need access to whatever you show via DVD, uTube, etc. The activity is also adaptable to a workshop format, requiring students to bring their drafts to class. This scene works well because there are a number of unanswered questions in it. Discuss what they came up with in their summaries, having them read their actual texts aloud. Be sure to note if something they say is analysis. Try to keep them focused on plot so that they understand the genre conventions of summary. Make note of what delineates a good summary on the board features like tone or objectivity, selectivity or inclusivity, etc. Show the clip again. Encouraging them to watch closely to see if we missed anything. Make sure to give them at least 10 minutes this time. Discuss their responses again, noting if something is summary. I write the analytical points on the board. This might take a little prodding, but once they get the hang of it, you should have no shortage of responses. This can also help with the concepts of claims and evidence-- be wary of students jumping to conclusions and ask them for evidence from the text film to support their claims. Take one of the responses and start a deeper, discussion-based analysis. What conclusions can we draw about, say, the briefcase in the Pulp Fiction scene? How do we know this? Afterwards, have the students discuss how the summary portions might become analysis. Some groups may need a little guidance, others will get it right away. I sometimes cut-up and distribute this paragraph to the class, or you could just project it if you have a tech room. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. It could be quite useful in any course in which a composition assignment focuses on writing fiction. In her book, Writing Fiction, Janet Burroway explains a very important aspect of fiction writing: Only trouble is interesting. This is not so in life. Life offers periods of comfortable communication, peaceful pleasure, and productive work, all of which are extremely interesting to those involved. But such passages about such times by themselves make for dull reading; they can be used as lulls in an otherwise tense situation, as a resolution, even as a hint that something awful is about to happen. They cannot be used as a whole plot. Turn a dull situation into something worth reading. He finds a beautiful deserted meadow with a lake nearby. The weather is splendid and so is the company. The food's delicious, the water's fine, and the insects have taken the day off. Afterward someone asks Joe how his picnic was. Joe and his friends race for the lake to get cold water on the bites, and one of Joe's friends goes too far on the plastic raft, which deflates. He can't swim, and Joe has to save him. On the way in he gashes his foot on a broken bottle. When Joe gets back to the picnic, the ants have taken over the cake, and a possum has demolished the chicken. Just then the sky opens up. When Joe gathers his things to race for the car, he notices an irritated bull has broken through the fence. The others run for it, but because of his bleeding heel the best he can do is hobble. Joe has two choices: try to outrun him or stand perfectly still and hope he's interested only in a moving target. They bowl three games together, and each person wins one game. There's a group of three high school boys in the lane next to them who courteously challenge them to a team game. The game ends in a tie, and everyone shakes hands afterwards. Joe even promises to help tutor one of them in math, and his girlfriend buys everyone sodas. They all have a great time. They rarely take these trips together, but Joe is confident they will enjoy whatever film he chooses for them to see. He decides on a romantic drama starring Robert Redford and Michelle Pfieffer, and they all enjoy it. Afterward his parents take him out for coffee and pastry. His mother comments on the fine acting, and his father, in a rare display of emotion, cries when asked how he feels about the plot. Joe pats his father on the back, and then leaves them with a feeling of contentment. They meet at a restaurant to talk about old times. Both of them are now married, and they each discuss how happy they are in their respective relationships. Write a paragraph or up to a page describing a reading or a position. Metaphor writing. Sometimes it may be easier to create a metaphor or simile may help you understand your view of an idea before you can put it fully into sentences or paragraphs. Write a metaphor or simile and then explain to someone why your metaphor works or what it means to you. Applying ideas to personal circumstance or known situations. Sometimes ideas come clearest when you can put them in a frame that is meaningful to you. Take a concept from your reading assignments and apply it so a situation in your own life or to a current event with which you are familiar. You may not end up using this application in your final draft, but applying it to something you know will help you to understand it better and prepare you to analyze the idea as your instructor directs. Organizing Once students have something on the page to work with, they can begin the decision-making process crucial to developing a coherent idea or argument. At this point, students will choose which ideas most appeal to them, which ideas seem to fit together, which ideas need to be set aside, and which ideas need further exploration. The following activities will help students make decisions as they shape ideas: Drawing diagrams. Sometimes it helps to look for the shape your ideas seem to be taking as you develop them. Jot down your main ideas on the page and then see if you can connect them in some way. Do they form a square? A circle? An umbrella with spokes coming down? A pyramid? Does one idea seem to sit on a shelf above another idea? Would equal signs, greater or less signs help you express the relationships you see between your idea? Can you make a flow chart depicting the relationships between your ideas? Making charts or piles. Try sorting your ideas into separate piles. You can do this literally by putting ideas on note cards or scraps of paper and physically moving them into different piles. You can do this on the page by cutting and pasting ideas into a variety of groups on the computer screen. You can also make charts that illustrate the relationships between ideas. Scrap pile. Be prepared to keep a scrap pile of ideas somewhere as you work. Some people keep this pile as a separate document as they work; others keep notes at the bottom of a page where they store scrap sentences or thoughts for potential use later on. Remember that it is sometimes important to throw out ideas as a way to clarify and improve the ones you are trying to develop along the way. Shifting viewpoints role-playing. You can do this by role-playing someone who disagrees with your conclusions or who has a different set of assumptions about your subject. Make a list or write a dialogue to begin to reveal the other perspective. Applying an idea to a new situation. If you have developed a working thesis, test it out by applying it to another event or situation. If you idea is clear, it will probably work again or you will find other supporting instances of your theory. Sometimes it helps to look at your ideas through a problem-solving lens. To do so, first briefly outline the problem as you see it or define it. Make sure you are through in listing all the elements that contribute to the creation of the problem. Next, make a list of potential solutions. Remember there is likely to be more than one solution. If your assignment asks you to develop a theory or an argument, abstract it from the situation at hand. Does your theory hold through the text? Would it apply to a new situation or can you think of a similar situation that works in the same way? Explain your ideas on paper of to a friend. Defining critical questions. You may have lots of evidence or information and still feel uncertain what you should do with it or how you should write about it. Look at your evidence and see if you can find repeated information or a repeated missing piece. See if you can write a question of a series of questions that summarize the most important ideas in your paper. Once you have the critical questions, you can begin to organize your ideas around potential answers to the question. Sometimes the most efficient way to clarify your ideas is to explain them to someone else. As you teach your ideas to someone, else you may begin to have more confidence in the shape of your ideas or you may be able to identify the holes in your argument and be more able to fix them. Lining up evidence. If you think you have a good idea of how something works, find evidence in your course material, through research in the library or on the web that supports your thinking. If your ideas are strong, you should find supporting evidence to corroborate your ideas. Rewriting idea. Sometimes what helps most is rewriting an idea over the course of several days. Take the central idea and briefly explain it in a paragraph or two. Try it again the next day. Over the course of three days, you may find your ideas clarifying, complicating, or developing holes. In all cases, you will have a better idea of what you need to do next in writing your draft. These exercises may ease their entry into shaping their ideas for an assignment: Clarify all questions about the assignment. Before you begin writing a draft, make sure you have a thorough understanding of what the assignment requires. You can do this by summarizing your understanding of the assignment and emailing your summary to your TA or instructor. If you have questions about points to emphasize, the amount of evidence needed, etc. Write a letter describing what the paper is going to be about. One of the simplest, most efficient exercises you can do to sort through ideas is to write a letter to yourself about what you are planning to write in your paper. In about 20 minutes, you can easily have a good sense of what you are ready to write and the problems you still need to solve in your paper.

Think about your topic in terms of personal question. So What? Now what? My exercise life essay, write for a page or more. Defining essays. Although this revision is revision and may seem obvious, it is often overlooked.

Write definitions for key terms or concepts in your own essays. Summarizing positions.

Chapter Peer Review and Final Revisions – Writing for Success 1st Canadian Edition

You can summarize readings by individual articles or you can combine personal you think are like perspectives into a summary of a position. Try to be brief in your description of the readings. Write a exercise or up to a page describing a essay or a position. Metaphor writing. Sometimes it may be easier to create a metaphor or simile may help you understand your revision of an idea before you can put it fully into sentences or paragraphs.

Try some of the other techniques listed here to get your ideas on the page Start with the easiest part. If you have trouble getting started on a draft, write what feels to you like the easiest part first. Write what you know for sure and a beginning will probably emerge as you write. Write the body of the paper first. See what you have to say in the bulk of your draft and then go back to craft a suitable beginning. Write about feelings about writing. Doing so can help you set aside uncertainty and frustration and help you get motivated to write your draft. Write with the screen turned off. If you are really stuck getting starting or in the middle of a draft, turn the monitor off and type your ideas. Doing so will prevent you from editing and critiquing your writing as you first produce it. You may be amazed at the quantity and quality of ideas you can produce in a short time. Write in alternatives postpone decision-making. You may need to test out more than one idea before you settle into a particular direction for a paper. Write with a timer. Sometimes what you need most is to get all of your ideas out on paper in a single sitting. To do so, pretend you are taking an essay exam. Set a timer for an appropriate amount of time 1 hour? Assume that it will take you approximately 1 hour per page of text you produce. Revising As students use language to shape ideas, they begin to feel the need to test their ideas or move beyond their own perspectives. Sometimes we have ideas that make good sense to us, but seem to lose or confuse readers as we voice them in conversation or on the page. Once students have a complete draft of a paper, they need ways to share their ideas to learn points where their ideas need further development. With feedback from an audience, students are better able to see the final decisions they still need to make in order for their ideas to reach someone. These decisions may be ones of word choice, organization, logic, evidence, and tone. Keep in mind that this juncture can be unsettling for some students. Having made lots of major decisions in getting their ideas down on the page, they may be reluctant to tackle another round of decision-making required for revising or clarifying ideas or sentences. They will need to be able to sell their ideas through the words and arrangement of words on the page for a specific audience. Talk your paper. Tell a friend what your paper is about. Pay attention to your explanation. Are all of the ideas you describe actually in the paper? Where did you start in explaining your ideas. Does your paper match your description? Can the listener easily find all of the ideas you mention in your description? Ask someone to read your paper out loud to you. Ask a friend to read your draft out loud to you. What do you hear? Where does your reader stumble? Sound confused? Have questions? Did your reader ever get lost in your text? Did ideas flow in the order the reader expected them to? Was anything missing for the reader? Did the reader need more information at any point? Share your draft with your instructor. If you give them enough notice, most instructors will be willing to read a draft of a paper. It sometimes helps to include your own assessment of the draft when you share it with a teacher. Give them your assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the draft, as you see it, to begin a conversation. Share your draft with a classmate. Arrange to exchange papers with a classmate several days before the due date. Look at your sentences. Often you will need to analyze your draft of the sentence level. To do so, break your paper into a series of discrete sentences by putting a return after each period or end punctuation. Once you have your paper as a list of sentences, you can more easily see and solve sentence level problems. Try reading the sentences starting with the last sentence of the draft and moving up. Doing so will take them out of context and force you to see them as individual bits of communication rather than familiar points. Discuss key terms in your paper with someone else. If you suspect this is the case, talk about your key terms with a friend, and ask them to read your draft to see if the idea is adequately explained for the reader. Outline your draft. After you have a complete draft, go back and outline what you have said. Next to each paragraph write a word or phrase that summarizes the content of that paragraph. You might also look to see if you have topic sentences that convey the ideas of individual paragraphs. Once you have summarized each paragraph, turn your summary words into a list. How does the list flow? Is it clear how one idea connects to the next? Underline your main point. Highlight the main point of your paper. It should probably be although it will depend on the assignment in one sentence somewhere on the first page. Writing at Work Understanding cohesion can also benefit you in the workplace, especially when you have to write and deliver a presentation. If you choose to use these elements, make sure they work well with the substantive content of your presentation. For example, if you are asked to give a financial presentation, and the financial report shows that the company lost money, funny illustrations would not be relevant or appropriate for the presentation. Tip Reading your writing aloud will often help you find problems with unity and coherence. Listen for the clarity and flow of your ideas. Identify places where you find yourself confused, and write a note to yourself about possible fixes. Creating Unity Sometimes writers get caught up in the moment and cannot resist a good digression. Even though you might enjoy such detours when you chat with friends, unplanned digressions usually harm a piece of writing. Following your outline closely offers you a reasonable guarantee that your writing will stay on purpose and not drift away from the controlling idea. However, when writers are rushed, are tired, or cannot find the right words, their writing may become less than they want it to be. Their writing may no longer be clear and concise, and they may add information that is not needed to develop the main idea. The wording clearly indicates how one idea leads to another within a paragraph and from paragraph to paragraph. When she revised her essay, she deleted the off-topic sentences that affected the unity of the paragraph. Did she cut too much, too little, or just enough? Is the explanation of what screen resolution means a digression? Or is it audience friendly and essential to understanding the paragraph? Collaboration: Please share with a classmate and compare your answers. Now, print out another copy of your essay or use the printed version s you used in Self—Practice Exercises Reread it to find any statements that affect the unity of your writing. Decide how best to revise. Tip When you reread your writing to find revisions to make, look for each type of problem in a separate sweep. Read it straight through once to locate any problems with unity. Read it straight through a second time to find problems with coherence. You may follow this same practice during many stages of the writing process. Writing at Work Many companies hire copy editors and proofreaders to help them produce the cleanest possible final drafts of large writing projects. Copy editors are responsible for suggesting revisions and style changes; proofreaders check documents for any errors in capitalization, spelling, and punctuation that have crept in. Many times, these tasks are done on a freelance basis, with one freelancer working for a variety of clients. Together, your style and tone create the voice of your paper, or how you come across to readers. Style refers to the way you use language as a writer—the sentence structures you use and the word choices you make. Tone is the attitude toward your subject and audience that you convey through your word choice. Determining an Appropriate Style and Tone Although accepted writing styles will vary within different disciplines, the underlying goal is the same—to come across to your readers as a knowledgeable, authoritative guide. Writing about research is like being a tour guide who walks readers through a topic. A stuffy, overly formal tour guide can make readers feel put off or intimidated. Too much informality or humour can make readers wonder whether the tour guide really knows what he or she is talking about. Extreme or emotionally charged language comes across as unbalanced. To help prevent being overly formal or informal, determine an appropriate style and tone at the beginning of the research process. Consider your topic and audience because these can help dictate style and tone. A strong research paper comes across as straightforward, appropriately academic, and serious. It is generally best to avoid writing in the first person, as this can make your paper seem overly subjective and opinion based. You can check for consistency at the end of the writing process. Checking for consistency is discussed later in this section. My sentences are varied in length and structure. This is not so in life. Life offers periods of comfortable communication, peaceful pleasure, and productive work, all of which are extremely interesting to those involved. But such passages about such times by themselves make for dull reading; they can be used as lulls in an otherwise tense situation, as a resolution, even as a hint that something awful is about to happen. They cannot be used as a whole plot. Turn a dull situation into something worth reading. He finds a beautiful deserted meadow with a lake nearby. The weather is splendid and so is the company. The food's delicious, the water's fine, and the insects have taken the day off. Afterward someone asks Joe how his picnic was. Joe and his friends race for the lake to get cold water on the bites, and one of Joe's friends goes too far on the plastic raft, which deflates. He can't swim, and Joe has to save him. On the way in he gashes his foot on a broken bottle. When Joe gets back to the picnic, the ants have taken over the cake, and a possum has demolished the chicken. Just then the sky opens up. When Joe gathers his things to race for the car, he notices an irritated bull has broken through the fence. The others run for it, but because of his bleeding heel the best he can do is hobble. Joe has two choices: try to outrun him or stand perfectly still and hope he's interested only in a moving target. They bowl three games together, and each person wins one game. There's a group of three high school boys in the lane next to them who courteously challenge them to a team game. The game ends in a tie, and everyone shakes hands afterwards. Joe even promises to help tutor one of them in math, and his girlfriend buys everyone sodas. They all have a great time. They rarely take these trips together, but Joe is confident they will enjoy whatever film he chooses for them to see. He decides on a romantic drama starring Robert Redford and Michelle Pfieffer, and they all enjoy it. Afterward his parents take him out for coffee and pastry. His mother comments on the fine acting, and his father, in a rare display of emotion, cries when asked how he feels about the plot. Joe pats his father on the back, and then leaves them with a feeling of contentment. They meet at a restaurant to talk about old times. Both of them are now married, and they each discuss how happy they are in their respective relationships. His ex-girlfriend's husband arrives at the restaurant and buys the three of them a round of drinks. He and Joe have a great time talking about football. They even find ways to give Joe's ex-girlfriend a hard time about the days of her youth. Joe feels no regret about the encounter and arrives at the hotel thinking of his wife. Once he enters his hotel room, he calls her long distance to tell her everything. It is designed to engage students with their essays on a sentence to sentence level that will enable them to write in a clear, concise, immediate style. Students will be required to pay close attention to language and to their closings. By this point, the students should have the bulk of their essays written and are therefore focused on revising and polishing their essays. The design of this exercise is to assist with sentence-by-sentence revision, thereby maximizing clarity and directness. Ask them to take 10 minutes to read over it, underlining instances of passive voice and also any striking similes or metaphors. Have a brief discussion about what they underlined, including a brief discussion of passive voice, using examples from the essay. Students should pick a paragraph of their choice and rewrite with the knowledge taken from discussion and their own using active, immediate language. Share with class! Have students implement this exercise in their own work for the next revision. An easy exercise for demonstrating descriptive writing - and descriptive responding. You'll write a 3-page draft not too long to go over in a class period of the paper your students are writing to go over with the class in order to model both workshopping and what is possible for the assignment typically the first assignment. If you write the paper then you can make sure it has all the positive and negative qualities that you desire. You can also use the same paper over and over again in later semesters. Be creative, you ask that of your students. Rather than tell my students what to do I show them in my own paper. This is an excellent way to show them what types of subject matter and language you think are worthwhile. I want my students to feel as though they can and should write anything they want so I try to choose personal often embarrassing but serious topics. I also show them uses of language, such as ways to use curse words effectively in an essay. I find next to nothing offensive and use this as a way of showing that. However, at the core use some decent writing and some good techniques. I tried to make an opener that would suck-in the reader and make them want to read more another thing I emphasize in my classes. I also try to get them to use interesting or at least uncommon titles thus the name of the exercise that add to the paper. It also works well to make a first and second draft of your paper and show students how to workshop and the process of drafting at the same time. Leave the second draft open for improvements. The Workshop: Project the example paper on the overhead screen and workshop it as a class, going paragraph by paragraph. You may wish to print the draft out and use the light board, as actually writing on the draft is helpful for modeling good feedback. Choose the option that best replicates the eventual workshop situation your students will soon be in. In essence, show them what you want from them as workshop responders. My classes always found things that I had missed in my own writing, and more often than not, found everything that I was hoping they would find.

Write a exercise or simile and then explain to someone why your revision works or what it means to you. Applying ideas to personal circumstance or known situations. Sometimes ideas come clearest when you can put them in a frame that is meaningful to you. Take a concept from your essay assignments and apply it so a situation in your own life or to a current event with which you are familiar.

Personal essay revision exercises

You may not end up using this exercise in your personal draft, but applying it to something you know personal help you to understand it essay and prepare you to analyze the revision as your exercise directs. Organizing Once students have something on the page to work with, they can begin the decision-making revision crucial to essay a coherent idea or argument.

In-Class Writing Exercises - The Writing Center

At this point, students will choose which ideas most appeal to them, which ideas seem to fit together, which ideas need to be set aside, and which essays need further exploration. The following activities will help students make decisions as they shape ideas: Drawing diagrams.

Sometimes it helps to look for the shape your ideas seem to be taking as you develop them. Jot down your main ideas on the page and then see if you can connect them in some exercise.

Do they form a square? A circle? An personal with spokes coming down? A pyramid? Does one idea seem to sit on a revision above another idea?

Would equal signs, greater or personal signs help you express the revisions you see exercise your essay Can you make a flow chart depicting the relationships between your ideas?

Making charts or piles. Try sorting your ideas into separate piles.

Personal essay revision exercises

You can do this personal writing an admissions essay putting ideas on note cards or scraps of personal and physically moving them into different piles. You can do this on the page by cutting and essay ideas into a variety of groups on the computer screen.

You can also make charts that illustrate the relationships between ideas. Scrap pile. Be prepared to revision a scrap pile how to exercise a scholarship essay if it is not specified ideas somewhere as you work. Some people keep this exercise as a separate document as they work; others keep notes at the bottom of a page where they store scrap sentences or thoughts for potential use later on.

Remember that it is sometimes important to throw out revisions as a way to clarify and improve the ones you are trying to develop along the way. Shifting viewpoints role-playing. You can do this by role-playing someone who disagrees essay your conclusions or who has a different set of assumptions about your subject.

Tip Reading your writing aloud will often help you find problems with unity and coherence. Listen for the clarity and flow of your ideas. Identify places where you find yourself confused, and write a note to yourself about possible fixes. Creating Unity Sometimes writers get caught up in the moment and cannot resist a good digression. Even though you might enjoy such detours when you chat with friends, unplanned digressions usually harm a piece of writing. Following your outline closely offers you a reasonable guarantee that your writing will stay on purpose and not drift away from the controlling idea. However, when writers are rushed, are tired, or cannot find the right words, their writing may become less than they want it to be. Their writing may no longer be clear and concise, and they may add information that is not needed to develop the main idea. The wording clearly indicates how one idea leads to another within a paragraph and from paragraph to paragraph. When she revised her essay, she deleted the off-topic sentences that affected the unity of the paragraph. Did she cut too much, too little, or just enough? Is the explanation of what screen resolution means a digression? Or is it audience friendly and essential to understanding the paragraph? Collaboration: Please share with a classmate and compare your answers. Now, print out another copy of your essay or use the printed version s you used in Self—Practice Exercises Reread it to find any statements that affect the unity of your writing. Decide how best to revise. Tip When you reread your writing to find revisions to make, look for each type of problem in a separate sweep. Read it straight through once to locate any problems with unity. Read it straight through a second time to find problems with coherence. You may follow this same practice during many stages of the writing process. Writing at Work Many companies hire copy editors and proofreaders to help them produce the cleanest possible final drafts of large writing projects. Copy editors are responsible for suggesting revisions and style changes; proofreaders check documents for any errors in capitalization, spelling, and punctuation that have crept in. Many times, these tasks are done on a freelance basis, with one freelancer working for a variety of clients. Together, your style and tone create the voice of your paper, or how you come across to readers. Style refers to the way you use language as a writer—the sentence structures you use and the word choices you make. Tone is the attitude toward your subject and audience that you convey through your word choice. Determining an Appropriate Style and Tone Although accepted writing styles will vary within different disciplines, the underlying goal is the same—to come across to your readers as a knowledgeable, authoritative guide. Writing about research is like being a tour guide who walks readers through a topic. A stuffy, overly formal tour guide can make readers feel put off or intimidated. Too much informality or humour can make readers wonder whether the tour guide really knows what he or she is talking about. Extreme or emotionally charged language comes across as unbalanced. To help prevent being overly formal or informal, determine an appropriate style and tone at the beginning of the research process. Consider your topic and audience because these can help dictate style and tone. A strong research paper comes across as straightforward, appropriately academic, and serious. It is generally best to avoid writing in the first person, as this can make your paper seem overly subjective and opinion based. You can check for consistency at the end of the writing process. Checking for consistency is discussed later in this section. My sentences are varied in length and structure. I have avoided using first person pronouns such as I and we. I have used the active voice whenever possible. I have defined specialized terms that might be unfamiliar to readers. I have used clear, straightforward language whenever possible and avoided unnecessary jargon. My paper states my point of view using a balanced tone—neither too indecisive nor too forceful. Word Choice Note that word choice is an especially important aspect of style. In addition to checking the points noted on Checklist Consider the following examples. Keeping Your Style Consistent As you revise your paper, make sure your style is consistent throughout. Look for instances where a word, phrase, or sentence does not seem to fit with the rest of the writing. It is best to reread for style after you have completed the other revisions so that you are not distracted by any larger content issues. Revising strategies you can use include the following: Read your paper aloud. Sometimes your ears catch inconsistencies that your eyes miss. Share your paper with another reader whom you trust to give you honest feedback. Another reader may be more likely to notice instances of wordiness, confusing language, or other issues that affect style and tone. Edit your paper slowly, sentence by sentence. You may even wish to use a sheet of paper to cover up everything on the page except the paragraph you are editing. This practice forces you to read slowly and carefully. Mark any areas where you notice problems in style or tone, and then take time to rework those sections. On reviewing his paper, Jorge found that he had generally used an appropriately academic style and tone. However, he noticed one glaring exception—his first paragraph. He realized there were places where his overly informal writing could come across as unserious or, worse, disparaging. Revising his word choice and omitting a humorous aside helped Jorge maintain a consistent tone. Read his revisions. They all have a great time. They rarely take these trips together, but Joe is confident they will enjoy whatever film he chooses for them to see. He decides on a romantic drama starring Robert Redford and Michelle Pfieffer, and they all enjoy it. Afterward his parents take him out for coffee and pastry. His mother comments on the fine acting, and his father, in a rare display of emotion, cries when asked how he feels about the plot. Joe pats his father on the back, and then leaves them with a feeling of contentment. They meet at a restaurant to talk about old times. Both of them are now married, and they each discuss how happy they are in their respective relationships. His ex-girlfriend's husband arrives at the restaurant and buys the three of them a round of drinks. He and Joe have a great time talking about football. They even find ways to give Joe's ex-girlfriend a hard time about the days of her youth. Joe feels no regret about the encounter and arrives at the hotel thinking of his wife. Once he enters his hotel room, he calls her long distance to tell her everything. It is designed to engage students with their essays on a sentence to sentence level that will enable them to write in a clear, concise, immediate style. Students will be required to pay close attention to language and to their closings. By this point, the students should have the bulk of their essays written and are therefore focused on revising and polishing their essays. The design of this exercise is to assist with sentence-by-sentence revision, thereby maximizing clarity and directness. Ask them to take 10 minutes to read over it, underlining instances of passive voice and also any striking similes or metaphors. Have a brief discussion about what they underlined, including a brief discussion of passive voice, using examples from the essay. Students should pick a paragraph of their choice and rewrite with the knowledge taken from discussion and their own using active, immediate language. Share with class! Have students implement this exercise in their own work for the next revision. An easy exercise for demonstrating descriptive writing - and descriptive responding. You'll write a 3-page draft not too long to go over in a class period of the paper your students are writing to go over with the class in order to model both workshopping and what is possible for the assignment typically the first assignment. If you write the paper then you can make sure it has all the positive and negative qualities that you desire. You can also use the same paper over and over again in later semesters. Be creative, you ask that of your students. Rather than tell my students what to do I show them in my own paper. This is an excellent way to show them what types of subject matter and language you think are worthwhile. I want my students to feel as though they can and should write anything they want so I try to choose personal often embarrassing but serious topics. I also show them uses of language, such as ways to use curse words effectively in an essay. I find next to nothing offensive and use this as a way of showing that. However, at the core use some decent writing and some good techniques. I tried to make an opener that would suck-in the reader and make them want to read more another thing I emphasize in my classes. I also try to get them to use interesting or at least uncommon titles thus the name of the exercise that add to the paper. It also works well to make a first and second draft of your paper and show students how to workshop and the process of drafting at the same time. Leave the second draft open for improvements. The Workshop: Project the example paper on the overhead screen and workshop it as a class, going paragraph by paragraph. You may wish to print the draft out and use the light board, as actually writing on the draft is helpful for modeling good feedback. Choose the option that best replicates the eventual workshop situation your students will soon be in. In essence, show them what you want from them as workshop responders. My classes always found things that I had missed in my own writing, and more often than not, found everything that I was hoping they would find. It is usually one of the best things I do all semester long. I usually close by asking them how they would respond to this as a first draft. I ask if it has potential, should be scrapped, etc. Then I tell them how I would respond--this tends to give them as idea of what to expect. Finally, students exchange their own essays with titles in order to critique the effectiveness of each title. I make a point of not completing it in writing but reading the last of it instead. In a letter from a gentleman to a friend. Where am I? She chewed threw her bonds [this sound fishy to anyone else? Do you want to read it? How does it lose your attention? So, the title became the description. People also had much longer attention spans and fewer competing stimuli! How can we make it better? What would you title the story? On the board, write the following title and discuss it: IT How does this title work? Does IT make you curious? How does the size of the book make you ironically interested in terms of the title? Then, either as a class in groups ask them to examine what the titles make them think and what they imagine the cover of the books would look like. Lord of the Flies Oxymoron creates interest What do we associate flies with? Dig out the dirt. Kick ass. Turn of phrase is out of the ordinary, and is both pleasing and dissonant to the ear. Who cares about ferns? There has to be something else going on there, we think. The color red paints sinister pictures in the mind. We know enough about this story by inference to maintain some interest. How does it target its appropriate audience — sports fans? I complete the discussion by extending the invitation: Can you guys think of any good ones, and why are they good? Back to Top What Is It? It makes students develop and possibly appreciate a creative approach to the writing method. By following a set of questions provided by the instructor, students will write a prose style response — not just a list or catalog. They should then write a creative response using the following questions or a similar format: You look around the room and see your object. How well can you see it? Where is the light coming from? You walk over to your object. How many steps did it take? Your object is lying next to several other things. One of these things reminds you of something or someone else. What does it remind you of? Pick up the object. How heavy is it? Can you toss it in the air? Put the object close to your eyes, so close that it becomes blurry. What do you see? Put your object against your ear. Does it make a sound? What does that sound or lack of sound remind you of? Put your object under your nose. What does it smell like? What does the scent remind you of? While you have the object this close to your face, you might as well taste it. Go ahead, stick out your tongue.

Make a list or write a dialogue to begin to reveal the other perspective. Applying an idea to a new situation.